1. Pretty fun time lapse video of parts of Downtown Omaha via ONElapse.

  2. I wanted to share this post from my friend Joshua DuBois in light of Mark Cuban’s comments and our country’s attempt at adequately discussing the issue of race in America.

    Thank You, Mark Cuban, For Speaking Up

    Censuring Cuban is the surest way to breed the Donald Sterlings of tomorrow. The country needs more candor like Cuban’s on the always fraught subject of race. Thank you, Mark Cuban.

  3. reasonsmysoniscrying:

"His brother pushed him. (The fact that his head is tightly wedged in a lampshade is actually of no concern.)"
Submitted By: Andi Location: Kentucky, USA

    reasonsmysoniscrying:

    "His brother pushed him. (The fact that his head is tightly wedged in a lampshade is actually of no concern.)"

    Submitted By: Andi
    Location: Kentucky, USA

    Reblogged from: reasonsmysoniscrying
  4. humansofnewyork:

"What’s your greatest struggle right now?""Wondering if we’ll fit in when we go to high school next year."

    humansofnewyork:

    "What’s your greatest struggle right now?"
    "Wondering if we’ll fit in when we go to high school next year."

    Reblogged from: humansofnewyork
  5. Crazy. 

    I still remember Big Omaha 2009 like it was yesterday…

    Take a walk down memory lane, back to those May days in 2009…

    Looking forward to what this year will hold and I’m grateful for the community that we have, not just in Omaha, but around the country.

    Full steam ahead!

  6. This. #TRUTH

    This. #TRUTH

    Reblogged from: becomingminimalist
  7. humansofnewyork:

"I was scared when my mom died, because she was always giving me good advice. And I wasn’t sure I’d be able to make it without her advice.""What’s the best piece of advice she ever gave you?""Believe in God.""When did you find it the hardest to believe in God?""I guess when I was eighteen or nineteen, cause you know, it’s the age you’re becoming a man, and you feel like you’re in control. Then you find out that you’re not."

    humansofnewyork:

    "I was scared when my mom died, because she was always giving me good advice. And I wasn’t sure I’d be able to make it without her advice."
    "What’s the best piece of advice she ever gave you?"
    "Believe in God."
    "When did you find it the hardest to believe in God?"
    "I guess when I was eighteen or nineteen, cause you know, it’s the age you’re becoming a man, and you feel like you’re in control. Then you find out that you’re not."

    Reblogged from: humansofnewyork
  8. humansofnewyork:

"I wish I hadn’t focused on my career so much when my kids were young. I missed out on some key moments.""What was your thought process at the time?""I told myself that I was spending time away from them in order to improve their circumstances."

    humansofnewyork:

    "I wish I hadn’t focused on my career so much when my kids were young. I missed out on some key moments."
    "What was your thought process at the time?"
    "I told myself that I was spending time away from them in order to improve their circumstances."

    Reblogged from: humansofnewyork
  9. As the community within Omaha continues to develop and change year over year, I’m excited to see what happens at this week’s Startup Event Draft this Thursday evening.

    The goal of the event, led by Dusty Reynolds of the Greater Omaha Chamber along with David Arnold of the Straight Shot Accelator, Shane Reiser of Startup Genome is to get more participants involved and engaged in the entrepreneurial community by starting and leading their own events.

    Any community can’t sustain itself on being run by one or two individuals or organizations for a long period of time.

    Any community is a stronger community and will go much farther if more, and new, people are invited to play a role in the creation of that community.

    So come out to Aromas this Thursday then stay for the Silicon Prairie News Meetup just after at Krug Park to hear the next big, Big Omaha speaker to be unveiled!

  10. holstee:

Each month in 2014 will have a specific theme which will tie together everything we do from designs, events and everything in between. Helen kicked off the year in January with Clarity. Now, we’re starting February with a focus on Connection. Building real connection is something important (and very different) for each of us. Whether with friends, family, lovers or strangers - the impact of these connections can be profound. Perhaps this is why in the US alone, we are okay with collectively spending over 230 thousand years worth of time on social media in a single month. The past decade has brought a plethora of new technologies that have introduced instant ways of connecting to our fingertips. They have also enabled a continuous and immediate feedback loop of sugar rush acknowledgements. And this is where we need to become more aware.  Skype, Google Hangouts, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat. These tools each represent ways to supplement and manage more human connections than ever. These social tools are likely to get better and better at mimicking the real thing, but what happens when they become full replacements for real human relationships? The Hollywood production Her opens a huge conversation of where this could lead in the not-so-distant future. To be fair, technology has facilitated remarkable things in this realm, too. It’s allowed me to see my nieces in Kenya grow up over the past years and to reunite with friends from high school. But most importantly, it has helped me to fully appreciate the difference between depth and breadth of connections.  It feels great to get likes or RT’s but like a sugar rush, once they pass I’m not left with much except a craving for more of the same. This example perfectly describes the cycle in which we seem to get stuck. Karen Van Bergen sums it up particularly well in her Huffington Post article, “Where Should We Meet?”:"More than we care to admit, we now pay for the ease and frequency of our communication with the depth of our relationships… The irony, of course, is that our vanishing connection to each other is actually driven by our deep need to connect.” Living in NYC combined with all these social tools makes it very easy to just hop from introduction to introduction at the expense of building depth of connection. At Holstee, one way we keep the need for depth in balance is by to host bi-monthly dinners, where we invite both longstanding and new friends to sit around a dinner table, talk together and open the door for real, genuine human connection. In summation, breadth of connection seems to happen more naturally  but depth of connection is something we need to consciously and constantly build. What are some ways you do this in your life? Other inspirations for this post came from:
How To Connect With Humanity by Leo Babauta 
Alone Together by Sherry Turkle 
The Human Connection by John Gowan

    holstee:

    Each month in 2014 will have a specific theme which will tie together everything we do from designs, events and everything in between. Helen kicked off the year in January with Clarity. Now, we’re starting February with a focus on Connection.

    Building real connection is something important (and very different) for each of us. Whether with friends, family, lovers or strangers - the impact of these connections can be profound. Perhaps this is why in the US alone, we are okay with collectively spending over 230 thousand years worth of time on social media in a single month. The past decade has brought a plethora of new technologies that have introduced instant ways of connecting to our fingertips. They have also enabled a continuous and immediate feedback loop of sugar rush acknowledgements. And this is where we need to become more aware. 

    Skype, Google Hangouts, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat. These tools each represent ways to supplement and manage more human connections than ever. These social tools are likely to get better and better at mimicking the real thing, but what happens when they become full replacements for real human relationships? The Hollywood production Her opens a huge conversation of where this could lead in the not-so-distant future.

    To be fair, technology has facilitated remarkable things in this realm, too. It’s allowed me to see my nieces in Kenya grow up over the past years and to reunite with friends from high school. But most importantly, it has helped me to fully appreciate the difference between depth and breadth of connections.  It feels great to get likes or RT’s but like a sugar rush, once they pass I’m not left with much except a craving for more of the same. This example perfectly describes the cycle in which we seem to get stuck.

    Karen Van Bergen sums it up particularly well in her Huffington Post article, “Where Should We Meet?”:

    "More than we care to admit, we now pay for the ease and frequency of our communication with the depth of our relationships… The irony, of course, is that our vanishing connection to each other is actually driven by our deep need to connect.”

    Living in NYC combined with all these social tools makes it very easy to just hop from introduction to introduction at the expense of building depth of connection. At Holstee, one way we keep the need for depth in balance is by to host bi-monthly dinners, where we invite both longstanding and new friends to sit around a dinner table, talk together and open the door for real, genuine human connection.

    In summation, breadth of connection seems to happen more naturally  but depth of connection is something we need to consciously and constantly build. What are some ways you do this in your life?

    Other inspirations for this post came from:

    Reblogged from: holstee
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